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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
. there are talking about the same basic issues. host: one of the shore signs of action in washington, we have heard there is a possibility that they could come back after christmas. guest: i have been telling clients since september we were going over the cliff. i was not sure there was a sign it or coming back before christmas. this last-minute deal of some time, it could easily be approved -- the house and senate do not need to be here for this because it will not be the big, big deal. this is not the grand compromise they are talking about here there is not enough support to do the technical things. this could be a simple package they do at the last minute. host: even if the white house and john boehner agree to a deal, congress may not pass it. guest: that is my biggest concern. it is possible the speaker and the president could reach a deal, there is a significant portion of the republican party that would rather go over the fiscal cliff and have a deal. host: this is a very important change. a lot of people say, 1995 and 1996, the speaker and president clinton were able to cut a deal addicted
questions, what is the top 10 actions that research universities, the federal government, and others can take to ensure that the research university can maintain the research needed to help the united states compete and achieve goals for vuremal and security in the 21st century. they are a working group of the national academy and they produce products that shape policies. that question posed by congress is pretty complicated and the n.r.c. leaders needed to put together a panel that represents a broadband of leaders, people from government, the academy, and the national laboratories. i had a privilege on being a member of that panel. congress asked for 10 actions we structured our report around 10 recommendation with a time frame in the next five to 10 years. one of those recommendations focused on policies of the flow of skull laars and students to the united states. more and more students are applying to come to our research universities. u.v.a. has had a 53% in the last three years alone. the u.s. benefits with talented students come to study and conduct research and we benefit if t
. in that sense, it could be an action-forcing response. in the sense of what is happening in the real economy, i think we would prefer our stock market to be based on things like profits, how well companies are doing, the overall state of the economy, and that these day to day changes, whether a deal gets signed on. you're 30 or december 5. i do not think we to be too concerned about the market long term. that changes if we go a few months without a deal. in that sense, these tax increases will they start to hurt everyone's paycheck, reduced consumer demand, and possibly put us in another recession. but over the short term, i do not see fears of that, even if the market drops sharply. guest: one of the things the market might react to is a drop in consumer spending. you might expect individual products to be affected pretty substantially. the other possibility is defense stocks. if the sequesters takes place, and the spending cuts start to hit, a lot of contractors will take it on the chin. the president will almost certainly isn't uniformed personnel. you would expect some changes in the stock
countries. it does not mean that we agree with the actions of all of our allies. trying to make that differentiation has been very difficult. >> i was wondering what it was like for you personally. you became an instant celebrity in china. people saw you buying your own coffee at starbucks, carrying your own luggage, and they could not imagine -- what was that like? >> it was overwhelming at first. it went viral. the pictures of us in the u.s.a. -- we were not even in china -- somehow when the virus. -- went viral. you were instantly recognized. peddlers and merchants on the great wall, we were asked by everybody for pictures. it was overwhelming, but for a flattering. the chinese have been very warm and gracious. >> how much does it matter to them that your father was born in china? >> it is a source of great pride that i am a chinese-american. my ancestors are all from china. my wife's family is from china as well. >> in some way, they expect you to take the chinese side and all of the issues? [applause] [laughter] >> there was commentary over the internet, a look at this comm
to consider carefully the path ahead. palestinian leaders need to ask themselves what unilateral action can really accomplish for their people. president abbas took a step in the wrong direction this week. we opposed his resolution. but we also need to see that the palestinian authority in the west bank still offers the most compelling alternative to rockets and permanent resistance. at a time when religious extremists claim to offer rewards in the hereafter, israel needs to help those committed to peace deliver for their people in the here and now. the leaders of the west bank -- president abbas and prime minister fayyad -- deserve credit for their real achievements on the ground. they made their streets safe again; they brought a measure of peace; they overhauled governing institutions. they have cooperated with israel to help enhance israel's security. and we have to be honest with ourselves that, right now, all of this needs our political and economic support to be sustainable. it also needs a political horizon. so particularly in light of today's announcement, let me reiterate that thi
. that would be a decisive yes. >> \[inaudible] >> you look at his scorecard with the heritage action. he was a 98 and i was closing in on i think it was a 090. there was a couple that separated us, maybe some of the more well-known votes. other than that, i'm not quite sure where we disagree. i would think philosophically we're on the same page and hopefully we'll continue to work together. i look forward to hearing more from the senator. >> last question. >> \[inaudible] >> that's a great question. you know, i think if john was here with me today he would say, tim, don't forget, it's not about growing up in life, it's about moving forward. and we define that differently. some see the senate as a move up, and i certainly do as well in a way. but i'm hoping that the message that the good lord's placed in my heart gets a shot and a leap forward, that we'll have the opportunity to let the message of real hope and opportunity resonate in places where it hasn't been before. and so i hope what john would say to me is celebrate for about 24 hours and get back to work. thank y'all very much. \[a
. i am seeing a plan to add action makes sense that i can bring back home. we continue to your members talking about the train to nowhere. bakersfield is not know where. -- nowhere/if you get on an amtrak for my district and want to go to southern california, if you get to his you have to jump off the train. what is the plan to get high- speed rail over their? >> i would be happy to submit that for the record. i would also be happy to have dan richard explain the high speed rail plan to you. >> thank you. i yield back. >> i caution some of the terminal city -- terminology. i saw some of the proposals. them slow i freeze this blo speed trains to know where. i got a number of letters from illinois same that they were somewhere. >> that only are you forthright about everything, but your passion for high-speed rail is so evident. i want to know that there are plenty members that stair that and not just for where we live up for a network that would eventually run across this country. i think that you are right. you have to start with a vision and then begin to build on that. we have talked
on the part of citizens their areas of priority in which they would like to see government take action first. health care was the first one. we certainly have now, with this election, i hope agreed that we will move forward in this arena. that to me is the likely candidate. that is where citizens are actually most interested. and that is where a lot of work is being done on the trust issue. there, government does have funds dedicated to achieving that purpose. that is where i would define it. >> one of the things we have not actually used the word big data although we have been talking a little bit about it -- wonder folks to talk about that. the big benefit in health care is around big data -- certainly one big benefit. the ability to know in much more real time, disease vectors and treatments and the like. in 10 years, are we going to be there? a little bit here and there now, but we are not there yet. >> it is difficult to look through a crystal ball. in some ways you can say we will never actually get their. but i think alan's response was very consistent with what i would expect. health
action as we are seeing with the data act. the administration has been reluctant to pursue. translate those into real action and exercise the bully pulpit of the presidency to make sure action happens. >> thank you. josh. >> i thought i would try to give a reporter's perspective on the issues related to transparency. for me the rubber meets the road, i would like to be getting more information where a think the administration has discretion to do more than it is currently doing. then we can discuss why it is falling short. i think the first one is pretty topical, which is the fiscal clift discussions going on. you have meetings taking place at the white house with stakeholders, small-business leaders, what is your call liberal interest groups and others. they have taken place behind closed doors. they would allow us and to see them. even when members of congress came to see them, they shut out before any discussion to place. who would think it should be any different? you can go back and look and find out one person who seemed to think things like this would be different is a guide by
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)